Photo of plants at Glasswing Greenhouse Photo of plants at Glasswing Greenhouse

How to Give Your Plant a Haircut

Featuring Glasswing Greenhouse’s in-house pro, Signe Quitslund

We’re the experts when it comes to keeping your hair looking fresh, but we’re as hopeless as most people at keeping those indoor apartment plants looking good. Rather than living a life without greenery, we turned to our friend Signe, a Plant Specialist, at Glasswing’s Greenhouse to get the 4-1-1 on caring for some of the most popular indoor plants.

Hand tripping plant with shears
Photo of a pothos plant

POTHOS

Epipremnum aureum

Great for the frequent traveler. Pothos prefer bright, indirect light (but can tolerate lower). Water when the top inch feels dry. When it droops, it’s thirsty!

HOW TO GIVE IT A CUT

Giving your Pothos a haircut helps manage the length of the vines and keeps it looking full and healthy—when you cut a pothos it stimulates new growth!

STEP 1

Cut the vine just below a leaf node (the area from which leaves grow out from the stem).

STEP 2

Continue until the plant starts to take on the desired shape.

STEP 3

Water so the soil feels moist to help it recover from pruning and promote new growth.

photo of plants

 

Expert tip: Trimmed vines can be easily propagated into new plants. Simply take any 4”-6” long piece of healthy stem, ensuring the cutting has at least four leaves, and remove the leaf closest to the cut end. Then stick the cutting in a jar of water, and put it in a place that gets plenty of bright, indirect sunlight. A month or so after roots begin to show, plant the cuttings in soil and treat your new plant the same as your others!

photo of fiddle leaf fig plant

FIDDLE LEAF FIG

Ficus lyrata

Great for the design-minded. A Fiddle Leaf needs direct sun or bright, indirect light. Water until saturated and leaking from the bottom—30% dryness in full sun and 50% in indirect light.

HOW TO GIVE IT A CUT

Always make clean cuts using sharp shears (tearing or ripping branches can cause infections!), and never prune away more than one-third of your trees foliage. Ficus sap can be very irritating to the skin, so make sure to wear gloves, too!

STEP 1

The first step is to remove any dead or broken branches, then move onto shaping the tree.

STEP 2

Locate a node (the place where a leaf or bud joins the branch) and cut at a slight downward slant close to but away from the node, leaving at least one node for new growth on that each branch.

STEP 3

To eliminate a branch completely, cut back to just before the trunk or main branch.

STEP 4

You can prune out dead material at any time of year, but when pruning for shape it’s important to do so only in fall and winter, when the plant is no longer actively growing.

photo of fiddle leaf fig plant

 

Expert tip: Rotate your Ficus frequently to keep the plant growing straight and ensure light gets through to each side, and keep the plant away from heating or cooling sources to prevent leaf drop or damage.

photo of a fern

FERNS

Pteridophytes

Great for a little spunk in your space. A fern does best with bright, indirect light or direct morning sun. Soil should be kept moist, but not soggy (never drier than a well-wrung-out sponge).

HOW TO GIVE IT A CUT

STEP 1

Using a sharp pair of shears, cut off dead fronds as they appear or as necessary to reshape your fern.

STEP 2

Cut near the base of the frond, just above the joint where it connects to the rest of
the stems at the ‘crown’ of the plant.

STEP 3

Some ferns have ‘runners’ that are brown and woody roots coming off the plant, and usually out of the pot. This is totally normal, but if you’d like to cut them back, trim just near the soil.

image of fern plant

 

Expert tip: Since most ferns are native to tropical climates, they like high humidity. Bathrooms with natural light make a great home, but humidity can also be increased with a little “natural hairspray” by misting the fronds regularly with a spray bottle!

photo of plants in Glasswing Greenhouse

About Greenhouse

Seattle’s Glasswing recently expanded its plant and floral department to a new full-service shop called Glasswing Greenhouse. In addition to offering a wide range of plants, floral arrangements and a fresh-cut flower bar, Glasswing Greenhouse provides a dedicated space for hands-on workshops, trunk shows, and other special events to engage and build community.

Check them out at 1351 E Olive Way, Seattle, WA 98122

www.glasswingshop.com

Photographer: AJ Ragasa (@ajragasa)

Special Thanks: Signe Quitslund (@squitslund)

Glasswing Greenhouse (@gwgreenhouse)

READ MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS IN OUR LATEST ZINE

 








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